The Truth About Beauty Sleep

The Truth About Beauty Sleep

 

Beauty sleep, fact or fiction? As it turns out, beauty sleep is far closer to the truth than we ever suspect suspected.

Beauty More Than the Eye of the Beholder

Lack of sleep does far more than cause excessive yawning and make your eyelids droopy. It can affect your appearance and the health of your skin. A study conducted at University Hospitals Case Medical Center and funded by Estée Lauder compared the skin health of people who got a healthy amount sleep, that’s between seven to nine hours, and those who did not. The skin of those who didn’t get enough sleep showed more signs of aging like fine lines, uneven pigmentation, slack skin, and reduced elasticity. Poor sleep also slowed down the skin’s ability to heal.

 

Sleep, or lack thereof, also affects the way people perceive your health and happiness. To get more insight into the relationship between sleep and appearance, Swedish researchers conducted a study wherein they compared two sets of photos. One set showed participants after having gotten eight hours of sleep, the other set were taken after being awake for thirty-one hours.

 

The sleep-deprived photos were rated as less healthy and attractive due to small facial cues like drooping eyelids and corners of the mouth. You can put a smile on your face when you’re tired, but the signs of exhaustion can’t be hidden

 

Of course, appearance isn’t everything but it can come back to affect your professional and personal life.

How to Get Your Beauty Sleep

All sleep is beauty sleep. It’s a matter of making sleep a priority and making consistent efforts to get enough. If you’re going to get the rest you need, you have to be comfortable. An old lumpy mattress could cause aches and pains or wakefulness during the night. Today, you can shop and order mattresses online. Many companies will deliver them to your front door. You can also keep your bedroom at a comfortable 60 to 68 degrees at night to help maintain the lower body temperature necessary for sleep.

 

Your habits surrounding bedtime can make or break the success of your sleep too. Going to bed and waking up at the same time every day helps the brain recognize when to start the release of sleep hormones. It also supports your body’s need to follow regular 24-hour cycles.

 

For those who have trouble falling asleep, a bedtime routine might be what you need. A routine that is performed at the same time and in the same order every day can trigger the release of sleep hormones. It also gives you a chance to calm down after a stressful day. For many people, reading a book, meditation, or listening to relaxing music can help slow the heart rate and reduce blood pressure before bed.

 

There are a few things you want to avoid close to bedtime. As much as we all love binge-watching Netflix, the bright light from televisions can suppress sleep hormones. Try shutting off your screens two to three hours before bed to keep your sleep cycle on track. The same goes for caffeine. Stimulants block the effects of sleep hormones and should be avoided for at least four hours before bed.

 

Sleep allows you to feel good on the inside and look amazing on the outside. And, when you feel good about yourself, you radiate the confidence you need for success.

 

 

 

Ellie Porter

Wed, Aug 1, 6:13 PM

 

 

to me

 

Hi Raven,

 

I thought I should check in since the writer of this piece was asking me about it. Could you let me know when it's going to go live?

 

Best,

Ellie

 

 

 

Ellie Porter
Managing Editor | SleepHelp.org
ellie@sleephelp.org


On Tue, Jul 24, 2018 at 4:30 AM, Ellie Porter <ellie@sleephelp.org> wrote:

Hi Raven,

I've copied a draft of this post below. Let me know if there's anything else (images, a blurb about Sleep Help, etc) you'd like me to include.

 

Best,

Ellie

 

The Truth About Beauty Sleep

 

Beauty sleep, fact or fiction? As it turns out, beauty sleep is far closer to the truth than we ever suspect suspected.

Beauty More Than the Eye of the Beholder

Lack of sleep does far more than cause excessive yawning and make your eyelids droopy. It can affect your appearance and the health of your skin. A study conducted at University Hospitals Case Medical Center and funded by Estée Lauder compared the skin health of people who got a healthy amount sleep, that’s between seven to nine hours, and those who did not. The skin of those who didn’t get enough sleep showed more signs of aging like fine lines, uneven pigmentation, slack skin, and reduced elasticity. Poor sleep also slowed down the skin’s ability to heal.

 

Sleep, or lack thereof, also affects the way people perceive your health and happiness. To get more insight into the relationship between sleep and appearance, Swedish researchers conducted a study wherein they compared two sets of photos. One set showed participants after having gotten eight hours of sleep, the other set were taken after being awake for thirty-one hours.

 

The sleep-deprived photos were rated as less healthy and attractive due to small facial cues like drooping eyelids and corners of the mouth. You can put a smile on your face when you’re tired, but the signs of exhaustion can’t be hidden

 

Of course, appearance isn’t everything but it can come back to affect your professional and personal life.

How to Get Your Beauty Sleep

All sleep is beauty sleep. It’s a matter of making sleep a priority and making consistent efforts to get enough. If you’re going to get the rest you need, you have to be comfortable. An old lumpy mattress could cause aches and pains or wakefulness during the night. Today, you can shop and order mattresses online. Many companies will deliver them to your front door. You can also keep your bedroom at a comfortable 60 to 68 degrees at night to help maintain the lower body temperature necessary for sleep.

 

Your habits surrounding bedtime can make or break the success of your sleep too. Going to bed and waking up at the same time every day helps the brain recognize when to start the release of sleep hormones. It also supports your body’s need to follow regular 24-hour cycles.

 

For those who have trouble falling asleep, a bedtime routine might be what you need. A routine that is performed at the same time and in the same order every day can trigger the release of sleep hormones. It also gives you a chance to calm down after a stressful day. For many people, reading a book, meditation, or listening to relaxing music can help slow the heart rate and reduce blood pressure before bed.

 

There are a few things you want to avoid close to bedtime. As much as we all love binge-watching Netflix, the bright light from televisions can suppress sleep hormones. Try shutting off your screens two to three hours before bed to keep your sleep cycle on track. The same goes for caffeine. Stimulants block the effects of sleep hormones and should be avoided for at least four hours before bed.

 

Sleep allows you to feel good on the inside and look amazing on the outside. And, when you feel good about yourself, you radiate the confidence you need for success.

Amanda WrightComment